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The use of compression clothing such as elastic shorts, full-length tights and knee-high socks has become more common among weight trainers, serious athletes and fitness enthusiasts. The increased use of compression clothing is likely due to accumulating scientific evidence showing enhanced exercise performance1,2 and muscle recovery3,4 when using compression garments.

Enhanced Blood Flow and Muscular Endurance

While initial studies investigating the use of compression garments for medical purposes showed a reduction in blood clot formation within the veins of postoperative patients that were prone to clot formation due to inactivity from being bedridden, these patients also demonstrated an increase in venous blood flow within their lower extremities. The increased blood flow led scientists to believe that compression garments could also improve exercise performance, as increased blood flow would bring more essential nutrients and oxygen to laboring muscles while simultaneously removing metabolic waste, which would collectively enhance muscular performance during exercise.

Well, it turns out that several studies have demonstrated the positive influence of compression garments on blood flow, and that the use of compression garments does improve muscular endurance, especially during maximal-intensity endurance training.5,6,7 For example, one study in particular8 examined the effect of wearing waist-to-ankle compression garments on active recovery after high-intensity treadmill running, with one training session incorporating the use of compression garments and a second session having each test subject exercising in regular running shorts. After each training session, blood samples were collected to determine levels of the metabolic byproduct lactate in the blood, and heart rates were also measured. The results of this study indicate that wearing compression garments augments the active recovery process by reducing lactic acid levels and lowering heart rate after high-intensity training.

Boost Strength and Power Output

The positive influence of compression garments doesn’t simply stop with enhanced endurance, as maximal strength and power can also be improved with the use of compression clothing.2 This effect likely stems from the rather unique capacity of compression garments to improve overall body movement and joint mechanics by enhancing a process known as proprioception, which is essentially the ability of the central nervous system to perceive body position and movement.4,9 Proprioception is a highly advanced system regulated by a variety of neural pathways coming from receptors in the skin, muscle and ligaments.2,3,10 The enhanced proprioception believed to be triggered by compression garments is mediated by receptors in the skin, known as mechanoreceptors, which are activated by the tension created from the compression garment. Greater activation of these mechanoreceptors increases feedback signals to the central nervous system11, which fine-tunes the perception of body and joint motion, ultimately improving proprioception.12,13 The enhanced proprioception likely improves control of all proprioceptors within this system, including those within muscle tissue that have the ability to increase muscle cell activation and muscle fiber recruitment, which should improve muscular strength and power.

While studies14 have reported mixed results regarding gains in strength when using compression clothing, a review of the literature by Born et al.15 revealed several positive results associated with the use of compression clothing in specific types of strength and power displays, such as sprint performance and vertical jumping. As a matter of fact, improvement in short sprints separated by short recovery periods was shown to rely heavily on several different metabolic and neuronal factors that enhanced muscle activation and muscle fiber-recruitment strategies16, indicating that improved proprioception, caused by the use of compression garments, played a significant role in improving sprint performance.

Improved Muscle Recovery

Weight training can induce muscle damage, especially when performing new training regimens or movements involving a lot of eccentric muscular contraction.17 The resulting muscle soreness is accompanied by a feeling of stiffness within the exercised muscle groups18 as well as a loss of strength and range of movement, also within the trained muscle groups.19,20 Some have claimed that compression garments can attenuate the negative symptoms associated with muscle damage by providing mechanical support to the injured muscle tissue, thus lowering the requirement for activity of the damaged muscle tissue, which will most certainly speed up the healing process.21

In fact, research has clearly shown that wearing compression sleeves for several days, following a muscle-damaging training session, does actually lead to a more rapid reduction in blood concentrations of the muscle damage marker creatine kinase, indicating a greater rate of recovery. Reductions in muscle soreness and decreased range of motion have also been observed when using compression garments, further indicating a greater rate of muscle recuperation.21

The squeezing effect from compression garments has also been shown to minimize swelling of the damaged muscle tissue by increasing the flow of lymph fluid from the lymphatic system, in a process known as lymphatic outflow. Since some of the swelling that occurs in muscle tissue is due to an increased pooling of lymph fluid within the muscle, the increased efflux of lymph from the muscle tissue caused by compression garments reduces post-exercise muscle swelling and pain.21 In fact, one study in particular looked at the effect of compression clothing, showing that reductions in muscle swelling when using compression clothing 24 to 48 hours after exercise was complete.14 Moreover, this reduction in swelling corresponded to improved recovery of muscular strength and power.

Enhanced Performance

In conclusion, it is pretty clear that compression clothing can enhance performance, especially while engaging in short bursts of high-intensity exercise such as repeated sprinting and jumping. This is likely because this form of anaerobic work generates high amounts of lactic acid, which reduces muscular function – and compression garments effectively remove lactic acid from muscle tissue, ultimately promoting a longer duration of muscular function. Additional benefits of compression clothing use also involves a greater rate of muscle recuperation stemming from the capacity of compression garments to reduce levels of muscle damage, swelling and soreness, resulting in greater recovery rates. Moreover, the improved recovery seems to be most pronounced when compression is applied for as long as one to two days after engaging in damage-inducing exercise to the muscle.

For most of Michael Rudolph’s career he has been engrossed in the exercise world as either an athlete (he played college football at Hofstra University), personal trainer or as a research scientist (he earned a B.Sc. in Exercise Science at Hofstra University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Stony Brook University). After earning his Ph.D., Michael investigated the molecular biology of exercise as a fellow at Harvard Medical School and Columbia University for over eight years. That research contributed seminally to understanding the function of the incredibly important cellular energy sensor AMPK – leading to numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals including the journal Nature. Michael is currently a scientist working at the New York Structural Biology Center doing contract work for the Department of Defense on a project involving national security. 

References:

1. Bringard A, Perrey S and Belluy, N. Aerobic energy cost and sensation responses during submaximal running exercise – positive effects of wearing compression tights. Int J Sports Med 2006;27, 373-378.

2. Doan BK, Kwon YH, et al. Evaluation of a lower-body compression garment. J Sports Sci 2003;21, 601-610.

3. Gill ND, Beaven CM and Cook C. Effectiveness of post-match recovery strategies in rugby players. Br J Sports Med 2006;40, 260-263.

4. Kraemer WJ, Flanagan SD, et al. Effects of a whole body compression garment on markers of recovery after a heavy resistance workout in men and women. J Strength Cond Res 2010;24, 804-814.

5. Ali A, Caine MP and Snow BG. Graduated compression stockings: physiological and perceptual responses during and after exercise. J Sports Sci 2007;25, 413-419.

6. Berry MJ and McMurray RG. Effects of graduated compression stockings on blood lactate following an exhaustive bout of exercise. Am J Phys Med 1987;66, 121-132.

7. Ali A, Creasy RH and Edge JA. The effect of graduated compression stockings on running performance. J Strength Cond Res 2011;25, 1385-1392.

8. Lovell DI, Mason DG, et al. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running? J Strength Cond Res 2011;25, 3264-3268.

9. Silver T, Fortenbaugh D and Williams R. Effects of the bench shirt on sagittal bar path. J Strength Cond Res 2009;23, 1125-1128.

10. Duffield R and Portus M. Comparison of three types of full-body compression garments on throwing and repeat-sprint performance in cricket players. Br J Sports Med 2007;41, 409-414; discussion 414.

11. Perlau R, Frank C and Fick G. The effect of elastic bandages on human knee proprioception in the uninjured population. Am J Sports Med 1995;23, 251-255.

12. Barrack RL, Skinner HB and Buckley SL. Proprioception in the anterior cruciate deficient knee. Am J Sports Med 1989;17, 1-6.

13. Kuster MS, Grob K, et al. The benefits of wearing a compression sleeve after ACL reconstruction. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31, 368-371.

14. MacRae BA, Cotter JD and Laing RM. Compression garments and exercise: garment considerations, physiology and performance. Sports Med 2011;41, 815-843.

15. Born DP, Sperlich B and Holmberg HC. Bringing light into the dark: effects of compression clothing on performance and recovery. Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2013;8, 4-18.

16. Bishop D, Girard O and Mendez-Villanueva A. Repeated-sprint ability – part II: recommendations for training. Sports Med 2011;41, 741-756.

17. Armstrong RB. Initial events in exercise-induced muscular injury. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1990;22, 429-435.

18. Howell JN, Chleboun G and Conatser R. Muscle stiffness, strength loss, swelling and soreness following exercise-induced injury in humans. J Physiol 1993;464, 183-196.

19. Nikolaidis MG, Jamurtas AZ, et al. The effect of muscle-damaging exercise on blood and skeletal muscle oxidative stress: magnitude and time-course considerations. Sports Med 2008;38, 579-606.

20. Nosaka K and Clarkson PM. Changes in indicators of inflammation after eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1996;28, 953-961.

21. Kraemer WJ, Bush JA, et al. Influence of compression therapy on symptoms following soft tissue injury from maximal eccentric exercise. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2001;31, 282-290.

 Ron Harris is pictured wearing compression garments.

The post Better Workouts With Compression Garments appeared first on FitnessRX for Men.

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By: Michael J. Rudolph, Ph.D.
Title: Better Workouts With Compression Garments
Sourced From: www.fitnessrxformen.com/training/better-workouts-with-compression-garments/
Published Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2020 15:47:34 +0000

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How to Become Successful at the Three Essential Marriages for Achieving a Great Life

Captura de pantalla 2024 04 11 a las 14.04.04

Captura de pantalla 2024 04 11 a las 14.04.04 1
Photo by spiritvisionstudios / Unsplash.com

“Human beings are creatures of belonging which we achieve through three marriages. First, through relationship with other people and other things (particularly and very personally, to one other person in relationship or marriage); second, through work; and third, through an understanding of what it means to be themselves.” David Whyte, The Three Marriages: Reimaging Work, Self and Relationship.

For more than fifty years I have helped people achieve success in all three kinds of relationships. Like many I married young. My wife and I were together for ten years and had two children before our marriage broke up. After a time of pain and healing, I fell in love again, and remarried. Looking back, I can see that one was a rebound relationship and it too ended.

Endings are painful for everyone, but when you’re a marriage and family counselor who makes his living helping fix relationships, it is not only painful, but shameful as well. I talk about it on my website, MenAlive.com in an introductory video, “Confessions of a Twice-Divorced Marriage Counselor.” Fortunately, I got my own help, worked through unhealed trauma from my past, and learned what it truly takes to have a successful marriage. My wife, Carlin, and I have been happily married for forty-four years.

            We all want a life that is happy and joyful, but how to achieve success is not often clear and easy.

“If you have to make one life choice, right now, to set yourself on the path to future health and happiness, what would it be?”

This question was asked by two world-renowned social scientists, Robert Waldinger, MD and Marc Schulz, PhD.

Dr. Waldinger is professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Harvard Study on Adult Development. Dr. Schultz is the associate director. The Harvard Study is the longest scientific study of happiness ever conducted. It began in 1938 and offers the most scientifically supported guidance for achieving a great life.

The latest findings are reported in Waldinger’s and Schulz’s book, The Good Life: Lessons From The World’s Longest Scientific Study of Happiness. In a 2007 survey, millennials were asked about their most important life goals. Seventy-six percent said that becoming rich was their number one goal. Fifty percent said a major goal was to become famous. More than a decade later, after millennials had spent more time as adults, similar questions were asked again. Fame was now lower on the list, but top goals again included things like making money, having a successful career, and becoming debt-free.

            What does the data from thousands of interviews over eighty-six years tell us? If we want a great life what is the one thing that is more important than others? The answer can be stated in three simple words: Create Good Relationships.

“In fact, good relationships are significant enough that if we had to take all eighty-six years of the Harvard Study,”

say Drs. Waldinger and Schulz,

“and boil it down to a single principle for living, one life investment that is supported by similar findings across a wide variety of other studies, it would be this:

Good Relationships keep us healthier and happier. Period.”

The Three Marriages We Must Embrace to Have a Successful Life

            In his book The Three Marriages: Reimaging Work, Self and Relationship, David Whyte says,

“Despite our use of the word “marriage” only for a committed relationship between two people, “in reality everyone is committed consciously or unconsciously to three marriages.”

            Whyte goes on to say,

“There is that first marriage, the one we usually mean, to another; that second marriage, which can so often seem like a burden, to work or vocation; and that third and most likely hidden marriage to a core conversation inside ourselves. We can call these three separate commitments marriages because at their core they are usually lifelong commitments and, as I wish to illustrate, they involve vows made either consciously or unconsciously.”

For most of my life I tried to find a balance between my work life and my love life. The truth is that I was much better at work than I was at love. It is not surprising. I had my first job when I was seven years old. My father had left when I was five, committed to a mental hospital after taking an overdose of sleeping pills because he had become increasingly stressed and depressed because he couldn’t make a living to support my mother and me.

With my father gone, my mother had to find work outside the home. We had little money beyond what was needed for the essentials, so I learned early to work for anything I truly wanted. I got good at work, but like many who grew up without a father and mother at home, what I learned about having a healthy and happy married life was minimal and I was too busy hustling for my next job success to have time to wonder about what it meant to get to know my true self.

For too many of us we feel like we are going up and down on a teeter-totter with our work and love lives competing for our attention while our personhood often gets neglected and forgotten. David Whyte offers us all a great service when he suggests this basic reality:

“Each of those marriages, is at its heart, nonnegotiable. We should give up the attempt to balance one against another, of, for instance, taking away from work to give more time to a partner, or vice versa, and start thinking of each marriage conversing with, questioning, or emboldening the other two.”

            With the framework of the three marriages, we can ask ourselves where we might need improvement. Here’s a little scale I find useful.

Captura de pantalla 2024 04 11 a las 13.42.30

How would you rate yourself in all five areas? I feel successful in all five areas, but it has been a lifelong process of healing and learning. I still have a way to go yet, like all of us. My score was 24. How about yours?

Bringing It All Together

For me, I have come to see achieving success at the three marriages as a true hero’s journey, one that lasts a lifetime. My wife, Carlin, is part Native American. In our area, there are several women who weave beautiful baskets made out of local materials that grow in nature. A well-known basket weaver described a well-made basket as a metaphor for creating a great life.

            Here’s how she describes the process.

“Our life is a basket woven from many different strands, each essential for a strong container. Each part of our life is one strand in this basket.It’s impossible to weave multiple strands at the same time; we need to attend to the strand that requires our attention without losing awareness of the others. Every strand will get our attention—just not all at the same time. I know I give attention to where I am most needed, knowing that I will then move on to the next demand. The basket holds my life as I strengthen individual strands. I’m no longer on a teeter-totter—I am weaving my life into something whole and lovely.”

When I reflect on my own life, there are times when I must focus on my wife, Carlin, knowing that there are other parts of my life that will require my attention at another time. At other times, one of our five children or seventeen grandchildren all for my attention. Yet, I can’t ever forget my work and my commitment to my calling. Running through all these “strands of my basket” is my commitment to my deepest self, getting to know who I really am and learning to love the man I am with all my flaws as well as my gifts.

I have written about how I have integrated these strands in the books I have written. If you are interested in learning about me and my work, I recommend, Inside Out: Becoming My Own Man, 12 Rules for Good Men, and Long Live Men: The Moonshot Mission to Heal Men, Close the Lifespan Gap, and Offer Hope for Humanity.

If you want to learn more about me and my relationship life, I recommend The Enlightened Marriage: The 5 Transformative Stages of Relationship and Why the Best is Still to Come, My Distant Dad: Healing the Family Father Wound, and Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places: Overcoming Romantic and Sexual Addictions.

If you would like to take one of my on-line courses, I recommend:

Navigating the 5 Stages of Love.

Healing the Irritable Male Syndrome.

Healing the Family Father Wound.

If you would like to join our mission to improve the lives of men and their families, I recommend:

The Moonshot for Mankind and Humanity.

If you would like to do individual or couple counseling with me, drop me a note at Jed@MenAlive.com and put “Counseling” in the subject line. I will send you the information. If you would like to receive my free weekly newsletter with updates and new articles, you can sign up here.

The post How to Become Successful at the Three Essential Marriages for Achieving a Great Life appeared first on MenAlive.

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By: Jed Diamond
Title: How to Become Successful at the Three Essential Marriages for Achieving a Great Life
Sourced From: menalive.com/how-to-become-successful-at-the-three-essential-marriages/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-become-successful-at-the-three-essential-marriages
Published Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2024 20:02:04 +0000

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The Japanese 3X3 Interval Walking Workout

Japanese Interval Walking 3 jpg

Japanese Interval Walking 3 1 jpg

The overarching principle of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is that the harder you do an exercise, the more physiological benefits you accrue; thus, by incorporating intervals of higher intensity efforts in your workouts, you can get more fitness bang for your buck in less time. 

When we think about HIIT, we tend to think about going absolutely nuts on a fan bike or doing all-out sprints.

But as Dr. Martin Gibala explained on the AoM podcast, while high-intensity training rises above the level of the moderate, it doesn’t require a complete max out of your heart rate, nor is it limited to certain exercise modalities.

You can do interval training by pedaling like a madman on a bike, but you can also do it with a less strenuous approach. 

Enter Interval Walking Training (IWT), which originated in Japan.

This 3X3 walking workout is simple: you do 3 minutes of low-intensity walking (40% of peak aerobic capacity for walking — a little faster than a stroll), followed by 3 minutes of high-intensity walking (70%+ of peak aerobic capacity for walking). You repeat these interval sets at least 5 times, and do this 30-minute workout 4 times a week.

Your heart rate during the high-intensity intervals will vary according to your fitness level and age. One 68-year-old who participated in an IWT-based study had his heart rate go up to about 130 beats per minute during the fast intervals, so you’re moving at a good clip.

Even though IWT is highly accessible, studies that have been done on it show that it produces significant health benefits. People who did Interval Walking Training 4X a week for 3 months experienced significantly more improvement in their blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, leg strength, and aerobic capacity than those who did continuous, moderate-intensity walking. 

Hiroshi Nose, who developed Interval Walking Training, reports that among those who do IWT, “Physical fitness — maximal aerobic power and thigh muscle strength — increased by about 20 percent which is sure to make you feel about 10 years younger than before training, [and] symptoms of lifestyle-related diseases (hypertension, hyperglycemia, and obesity) decreased by about 20 percent.” IWT walkers enjoyed mental health benefits as well: depression scores dropped by half.

Walking in general is already one of the very best forms of exercise you can do, and IWT just helps you take its benefits up a notch. Hiroshi has used Interval Walking Training to get thousands of elderly Japanese citizens into shape, and it’s a great form of exercise if you’re in the older decades of life. But it’s also good if you’re just beginning your fitness journey and looking to get off the couch and start doing more physical activity. Even if you’re already a regular exerciser who’s in good shape, IWT is a nice way to mix up your usual neighborhood strolls while enhancing your health even further. 

For more HIIT protocols, from the accessible to the challenging, listen to this episode of the AoM podcast:

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By: Brett & Kate McKay
Title: The Japanese 3X3 Interval Walking Workout
Sourced From: www.artofmanliness.com/health-fitness/fitness/the-japanese-3×3-interval-walking-workout/
Published Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2024 17:35:28 +0000

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The Miracle of Men, Women, and Couples: Allowing Our Vulnerabilities to Bring Us Together

a couple of miracles

a couple of miracles 1

It isn’t easy being a man in today’s world. The same is true for being a woman. Finding the right partner and creating a joyful, long-lasting, marriage is truly a miracle. In their book. In their book, A Couple of Miracles: One Couple, More Than a Few Miracles, Joyce and Barry Vissell share their life journey. Joyce, a nurse/psychotherapist and Barry doctor/psychiatrist, offer wisdom for men, women, and couples who are wanting to find the secrets for a long and successful life, career, and marriage.

I have known Joyce and Barry for many years. My wife, Carlin, and I attended a couple’s retreat with them to celebrate our tenth anniversary. Our forty-four-year marriage has been enriched by our time with Joyce and Barry.

Joyce and Barry have been a couple since 1964, have raised three children, written ten books, and helped countless people in their workshops and counseling practice. They can be reached at SharedHeart.org. I recently did a podcast interview with Barry and we explored their work, the new book, Barry’s work with men, Joyce’s work with women, and their joint work with couples.

I recently attended a men’s retreat with Barry and seventeen other men from around the country. It was a unique and wonderful experience that I recommend to all men. From the very beginning Barry invited us all to be vulnerable and share the real challenges we were facing in our lives. He started by sharing his own, things that most of us hide, even from ourselves.

“We need to let our partners see us more deeply,”

said Barry.

“We need to feel and express our feelings. Men sometimes feel hurt or afraid, but we’re often taught to keep it well hidden.”

Barry went on to share some of the real problems that he and Joyce have experienced in their own lives. As others shared, hearts opened, tears were shed. We talked about our hopes and dreams and our losses and betrayals.

I shared my experiences, having been married twice before, and the shame I felt being “a twice-divorced marriage and family counselor.” I talked about my forty-four-year marriage to my wife, Carlin, and my fear and anguish at the thought of losing her.

Barry shared his own fears of what he would do if Joyce died. Other men opened up about broken promises and broken marriages. Several men had recently dealt with relationships that had recently ended and shared their pain and anger.

 “Outwardly, we often present a strong, competent image,”

said Barry.

“Showing our human frailty to our loved ones gives them a very wonderful gift of love. When we feel sad, instead of covering it up with activity, we can share it with a loved one. Instead of jumping into an angry posture every time we feel hurt, the vulnerable and courageous approach is to reveal the hurt feelings directly, without anger or resentment.”

Barry acknowledged that many of us were in relationship with strong, competent, women. He encouraged us to also recognize “the little girl” that lives inside each of the women in our lives.

When I returned home after the end of the retreat, I shared what Barry had said about “the little girl” within. Carlin wept with recognition.

“I’ve spent my whole life taking care of others,”

Carlin said.

“I haven’t done a very good job taking care of the little girl inside me.

I held her and let her little girl be vulnerable, as she has so often held me as I let the little boy in me reveal his worries, fears, and pain. I used to think that it was manly to suffer in silence, to be forever strong for others. But I now know that our vulnerability is our real superpower.

I have been somewhat obsessed with life and death for a long time now. When I was five years old my father took an overdose of sleeping pills when he became increasingly depressed because he couldn’t support his family doing the work he loved. Though he didn’t die, our lives were never the same. I grew up wondering what happened to my father and when it would happen to me. For most of my life I blocked out the terror of my childhood.

I grew up like many males, denying my own vulnerability, and imagined that if I were smart enough and successful enough I could outrun my fears and furies. At various times I acted like I was the lone wolf, top dog, alpha male, lone ranger, superman. I didn’t trust others, particularly other guys, who I felt I needed to compete against in order to get women, money, power, and glory I craved.

That changed for me when I joined my first men’s group in 1979. Carlin has said on many occasions that the reason she believes we have had a successful forty-four-year marriage is because I’ve been in a men’s group for forty-five years. Our group continues to meet, though three of our members have died. I’m now the eldest member of the group as I recently celebrated my 80th birthday.

Carlin has also been in several women’s groups which give her the love and support that only women can give. We also have been in a mixed group, we call “The Village Circle” where men and women can learn to love and support each other.

Joyce and Barry have had a similar path and offer counseling, retreats, and much more. You can get their latest information at SharedHeart.org. The world needs more miracles. We need each other and the world needs each of us to be the best men and women we can be.

We live in challenging times. Vaclav Havel, Czech statesman, author, poet, playwright and dissident, offers an important truth about the times in which we live.

“I think there are good reasons for suggesting that the modern age has ended. Today, many things indicate that we are going through a transitional period, when it seems that something is on the way out and something else is painfully being born. It is as if something were crumbling, decaying, and exhausting itself, while something else, still indistinct, were arising from the rubble.”

In a recent article, “Men and Relationships,” Barry says,

“Over the years of working with men and their relationships, not to mention my own 59-year relationship with Joyce, I have seen some central issues emerge.”

He goes on to enumerate eight areas that are particularly important. Number eight is “Reach Out More to Other Men.”

Barry says,

“Many men tend to isolate themselves from meaningful relationships with other men. I have observed that many men are nearly starved for father/brother love. Because of our fear of this need, we have pushed away half the population of the earth. Practice vulnerability with other men, and you will find it becomes even easier to be vulnerable with your partner. Deepening your friendship with a man leads to deepening your friendship with yourself. And this allows you to become more accessible to your partner.”

Barry and Joyce practice what they recommend to others. Both Carlin and I have benefitted from their wisdom over the years. You will too. You can visit Barry and Joyce here.

If you appreciate articles like these, come visit me, Jed Diamond, here.

The post The Miracle of Men, Women, and Couples: Allowing Our Vulnerabilities to Bring Us Together appeared first on MenAlive.

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By: Jed Diamond
Title: The Miracle of Men, Women, and Couples: Allowing Our Vulnerabilities to Bring Us Together
Sourced From: menalive.com/the-miracle-of-men-women-and-couples/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-miracle-of-men-women-and-couples
Published Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2024 02:32:57 +0000

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