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Thirty-six cars are set to contest the second round of the Fanatec GT World Challenge Europe powered by AWS Sprint Cup season, with the Bronze Cup field joining after being absent at Brands Hatch.

The introduction of the class with a Bronze-driver mandate results in an increase of eleven cars compared to the opening round, where only Pro, Silver and Gold Cup were on the grid.

Notably, the full grid at Misano features two cars less than the full-season entry list released in February, the result of a Gold Cup entry from Team WRT and Tresor Attempto’s second Bronze entry not materializing.

Reigning Bronze Cup champion Alex Malykhin will not defend his title this year, meaning a new champion is guaranteed to be crowned.

Last year’s runner-up Miguel Ramos is back on the grid with Garage 59, sharing the No. 188 McLaren 720S GT3 Evo with Louis Prette.

Other returning names from last year include Stephane Denoual and Steven Palette aboard the No. 44 Schumacher CLRT Porsche 911 GT3 R, as well as Andrey Mukovoz and Philipp Sager.

Mukovoz will share the No. 66 Tresor Attempto Racing Audi R8 LMS GT3 Evo II with Dylan Pereira, while Sager drives alongside Marvin Dienst at Dinamic GT.

Dennis Marschall, who drove alongside Mukovoz last year, has moved to join Rutronik Racing and shares the No. 97 Porsche with Dustin Blattner.

Darren Leung reforms his British GT Championship-winning partnership with Dan Harper aboard the No. 998 Century Motorsport BMW M4 GT3, while Lamborghini is represented by three cars from Barwell Motorsport and Imperiale Racing.

The remainder of the field features few notable changes, with Alexander Sims returning to the cockpit of the No. 90 Madpanda Motorsport Mercedes-AMG GT3 Evo after racing with the team at Brands Hatch.

Comtoyou Racing has altered the lineup aboard the No. 12 Aston Martin Vantage GT3 Evo, with Charles Clark replaced by Belgian racer Lorens Lecertua.

The 17-year-old will make his Fanatec GT Europe debut after previously racing in GT4.

Lamborghini Super Trofeo Europe regular Gilles Stadsbader will also make his series debut, joining Ivan Klymenko aboard the No. 26 Sainteloc Racing Audi.

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By: Davey Euwema
Title: Sprint Field Grows to 36 Cars at Misano as Bronze Cup Joins
Sourced From: sportscar365.com/sro/world-challenge-europe/sprint-field-grows-to-36-cars-at-misano-as-bronze-cup/
Published Date: Tue, 14 May 2024 09:31:24 +0000

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Tiger Woods missed the PGA Championship cut but his legacy played on

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Tiger Woods has always played to win. Since turning professional in 1996, he has won 82 tournaments, including 15 major championships. Perhaps, more astonishing than the victories and majors is the 142-event made cut streak that lasted over a seven-year period from 1998 to 2005, when he was the most dominant golfer that the game has ever seen.

Woods never said he was the greatest. He didn’t need to. “There is no sense in going to a tournament if you don’t believe that you can win it,” he once said.

Yet, coming into the PGA Championship at the Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky, Woods was circumspect about his chances of hoisting his fifth Wanamaker Trophy. Asked about the state of his game, he admitted that he was rusty and that the barrage of injuries had taken a toll on his body. “I can still hit shots,” he said on Tuesday. “It’s getting around is more of the difficulty that I face day-to-day and the recovery of pushing myself either in practice or in competition days.”

When the tournament began on Thursday, Woods, who was making his 23rd appearance in the PGA Championship, performed like the part-time player that he has become over the last several years. On his way to a 1-over par 72, the 48-year-old World Golf Hall of Famer hit a smattering of good shots but hardly kept pace in a first round that saw a record 64 players shoot under par scores.

“It’s just the competitive flow,” he said after the round. “It took me probably three holes to get back into competitive flow again and get a feel for hitting the ball out there in competition, adrenaline, temperatures, green speeds. These are all things that normally I adjust to very quickly, and it just took me a few holes to get into it.”

GettyImages 1203994953 edited 3 scaled
Tiger Woods holds the Wanamaker Trophy after winning the 82nd PGA Championship on Aug. 20, 2000, at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky.

David Cannon/Getty Images

By Friday afternoon, the tournament had been temporarily upstaged by the early morning arrest of Scottie Scheffler, the game’s No. 1 ranked player, for allegedly disobeying a police officer’s order at the entrance to the Valhalla Golf Club. Looking invincible like the Woods of old, Scheffler settled down after the shock of being handcuffed and hauled off to jail to shoot a 5-under par 66 to go into the weekend with a chance to win his second major of the year after taking the Masters last month. As Scheffler went off to answer questions about spending time in a Louisville holding cell, Woods was starting his round and would need a good one to avoid missing just his 15th cut in 93 major appearances.

Starting his second round two shots off the projected cut of 1 under par, Woods went seven over par in his first four holes to guarantee that he would miss the cut. It’s hard to imagine a worst scenario for a player already battling competitive rust and old age in a game dominated by much younger players. Here he was looking ahead to the next tournament, the next opportunity to show that he could still play at next month’s U.S. Open at Pinehurst, but stuck for five hours on a golf course where he had solidified his legend 24 years earlier in an epic duel with Bob May at the 2000 PGA Championship.

Back then when Woods was in the morning of his career, he turned the Jack Nicklaus-designed Valhalla Golf Club into a theater with a two-act play and May as his benevolent antagonist. In the final round in 2000, they matched each other shot for shot, creating a drama unprecedented in televised golf history. Then in the three-hole aggregate playoff, Woods survived to win by one stroke. That victory at Valhalla was the third leg of the Tiger Slam, which climaxed when Woods won the 2001 Masters.

But these are different times in the game of golf. In 2000, the PGA Tour was in the beginning of a period of monumental growth as an outsized talent with a mixed racial heritage was transforming what had long been identified as a country club sport played mostly by white people. To many, Woods was the game and the PGA Tour was his home. Now, no longer the masterful player capable of holding your attention for hours on Sunday with his feats of excellence, Woods has become a senior statesman in the game and a defender of what he has helped to build in the sport over the last 30 years.

As the biggest name on both the PGA Tour Policy Board and the PGA Tour Enterprises Board, Woods has become one of the most powerful figures in negotiations between the PGA Tour and Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF), which funds LIV Golf. During what is turning out to be a slow and painful exit from competitive golf, Woods is helping to set the direction of the future of the game.

At Valhalla, he took on his new role.

“We’re trying to make the PGA TOUR the best it can be day-in and day-out,” he said Tuesday. “That’s one of the reasons why we have arguments and we have disagreements, but we want to do what’s best for everyone in golf and the TOUR.”

About the PGA Tour’s negotiations with LIV Golf, he said, “we’re making steps and it may not be giant steps, but we’re making steps.”

Easily missing the cut at the PGA Championship after a six-over par 77 on Friday, Woods didn’t take any steps toward reclaiming a place at the top of the pecking order of the best players. At Valhalla, he still commanded the biggest galleries like he did when he won there 24 years ago. Back then, he was looked upon by many as the savior of the game, who gave an inspiring and life-changing sermon on Sunday afternoons with his golf clubs.

That seemingly ubiquitous presence on Sundays is waning, but his star still shines brightly over these players still playing on the weekend on a stage he set for them.

———————–

By: Farrell Evans
Title: Tiger Woods missed the PGA Championship cut but his legacy played on
Sourced From: andscape.com/features/tiger-woods-missed-the-pga-championship-cut-but-his-legacy-played-on/
Published Date: Sat, 18 May 2024 16:07:58 +0000

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Revisit Amy Winehouse’s Celebration For “Rehab” Winning Record Of The Year In 2008 | GRAMMY Rewind

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When the world first heard Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back to Black’ in 2006, the album changed pop music forever with its nostalgic, trauma-stricken grief, becoming her most enduring legacy. In honor of the beloved beehive-wearing chanteuse and the release of a new Winehouse biopic, also titled Back to Black, GRAMMY.com celebrates her life and timeless music. Look back at the 50th GRAMMY Awards in 2008, when she won her first five GRAMMYs, including Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year for “Rehab” as well as Best New Artist.

About the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs:
Recording Academy is the world’s leading society of musical professionals and is dedicated to celebrating, honoring, and sustaining music’s past, present and future.

Connect with the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs:
WEBSITE: https://www.grammy.com
FACEBOOK: https://grm.my/2gcTcMk
TWITTER: https://grm.my/2gDUHUD
INSTAGRAM: https://grm.my/2gZGIvJ

Subscribe NOW to the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs on YouTube: https://grm.my/1dTBF8H

————————

By: Recording Academy / GRAMMYs
Title: Revisit Amy Winehouse’s Celebration For “Rehab” Winning Record Of The Year In 2008 | GRAMMY Rewind
Sourced From: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vt54zCqoRMw

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Baller Awards

Revisit Amy Winehouse’s Celebration For “Rehab” Winning Record Of The Year In 2008 #amywinehouse

hqdefault 20

hqdefault 21

When the world first heard Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back to Black’ in 2006, the album changed pop music forever with its nostalgic, trauma-stricken grief, becoming her most enduring legacy. In honor of the beloved beehive-wearing chanteuse and the release of a new Winehouse biopic, also titled Back to Black, GRAMMY.com celebrates her life and timeless music. Look back at the 50th GRAMMY Awards in 2008, when she won her first five GRAMMYs, including Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year for “Rehab” as well as Best New Artist.

About the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs:
Recording Academy is the world’s leading society of musical professionals and is dedicated to celebrating, honoring, and sustaining music’s past, present and future.

Connect with the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs:
WEBSITE: https://www.grammy.com
FACEBOOK: https://grm.my/2gcTcMk
TWITTER: https://grm.my/2gDUHUD
INSTAGRAM: https://grm.my/2gZGIvJ

Subscribe NOW to the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs on YouTube: https://grm.my/1dTBF8H

————————

By: Recording Academy / GRAMMYs
Title: Revisit Amy Winehouse’s Celebration For “Rehab” Winning Record Of The Year In 2008 #amywinehouse
Sourced From: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWU8iM32E8w

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