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Butts in seats make the racers go ‘round: Behind the main Grandstand at the start/finish line.
Butts in seats make the racers go ‘round: Behind the main Grandstand at the start/finish line. (BMW Group/)

“There’s nowhere in the world like the Isle of Man TT.”

–2022 Winner Peter Hickman

You can’t argue with the man on that point. While time, shifting attitudes and riding technology have marched on, the Isle of Man TT is largely unchanged, at least in terms of the 37.55 mile course itself. The race is run much differently than when Giacomo Agostini famously boycotted the race in 1972 after the death of his friend Gilberto Parlotti, with the circuit eventually being dropped from the Grand Prix schedule in 1977. Professional racers no longer have to face the mountain course to keep their job. The “amatuer” status of IoM TT entrants saved the event, really. Winning the IoM TT earns you a pittance of a purse, around £18,000. But the reward can’t be measured in money. It’s not a task for the career-oriented. It’s an obsession for dreamers and the slightly insane.

By now the ink has dried on much of the post-2022 Isle of Man TT reaction. It’s worth more than a short pause to consider a sporting event that took the lives of five contestants. Maybe longer than the 20 minutes IoM TT officials took before resuming prize ceremonies after the announcement of the death of sidecar racers Roger and Bradley Stockton, whose deaths were the fourth and fifth fatalities in this year’s event, the highest death toll since 1989.

Boosters of the sport will talk of racers being clear-eyed about the risks and rewards. And that’s true, of the racers themselves. But for race organizers and the 85,000 or so residents of this self-governed 221-square mile British island, risk and reward means something different. Their “risk” is that the event won’t bring in £37M in needed revenue, as it did in 2019, the last event before Covid interrupted the event. Their “reward” is the thrill of the event itself, but more accurately, the thousands of tourists who bring the above mentioned revenue to local business and island treasury. It means financial survival.

Though they face differing equations and answers to risk and reward ratios, the responses of organizers and racers to event fatalities are the same. They pause briefly, then resume their quest. They offer the same consolations and bromides they always do, then carry on out of necessity. All the hand-wringing and pearl-clutching in the world won’t bring back the dead, and it misses the point.

Whether the race is canceled isn’t really up to most of the participants, whether they’re racers or event workers. Racers won’t stop coming to the island to race, and race organizers won’t stop organizing the race until it becomes financially unsustainable. Meditations on mortality won’t help either party. It won’t help racers successfully thread their way through Ballagerey, and it won’t help race organizers manage airlifts to mainland ER’s for the wounded. Neither can properly do their job while mourning. So they don’t, for as long as the track is live. Afterwards, it’s up to them.

If you think this is a condemnation of the Isle of Man TT, you’re wrong. The race should go on for as long as legally allowed. It’s a triumph of human skill, luck and nerves over death, at least temporarily. To end the tradition would silence a tiny part of ourselves. The world needs these small terrible freedoms. Would you have asked Marc-Andre Leclerc to stop free-climbing alpine mountains? Would banning free-climbing stop climbers from attempting the improbable? Obviously not. Nor should it.

To us, the people who watch, the riders who perish should be worth more than brief moments of awkward silence or well-worn clichés. If we choose to keep watching, we should absolutely and completely acknowledge what we might see happen. Without spectators, there is by definition no spectacle. It’s up to us whether the IoM TT goes on. But our spectacle is more than just spectacle. It’s a race like no other on Earth, one where entrants regularly die. A hunter knows how he got his meat. It’s a celebration of life that takes place next to death.

Peter Hickman won the 2022 Isle of Man TT Supersport title. He did it by averaging 129.432 mph for the race overall, and 132.274 mph on his final lap, aboard his Gas Monkey Garage by FHO Racing BMW. In addition to the Senior TT, Hickman also won the Supertwin, Superstock and Superbike classes. It was his 2nd Senior TT victory, and the four overall 2022 victories make for a total of nine victories across several classes.

His qualifying efforts foreshadowed his wins. On Thursday, the fifth day of

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By: Anders T. Carlson
Title: The 2022 Isle of Man TT: Some Thoughts
Sourced From: www.motorcyclistonline.com/story/news/should-isle-of-man-tt-race-continue-editorial-perspective/
Published Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 10:00:03 +0000

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Motor

81st Goodwood Member’s Meeting

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With an almighty roar, Goodwood welcomed a fleet of incredible cars from the Canadian-American Challenge Cup, including examples from McLaren, Shadow and Porsche – three of the most successful marques in Can-Am’s history. The 81st Members’ Meeting also remembered Niki Lauda with 2024 marking a series of significant anniversaries for the three-time Formula 1 World Champion, including 50 years since his first Grand Prix victory in the 1974 Spanish Grand Prix, 40 years since his third and final World Championship, and 75 years since the Formula 1 Champion’s birth. A special on-track demonstration saw Lauda’s 1985 Dutch Grand Prix-winning McLaren MP4/2B on track and the legendary driver will also be honored later in the year at the Festival of Speed presented by Mastercard.

 Kieran Cleeves
Kieran Cleeves/PA Media Assignments
 Kieran Cleeves
Kieran Cleeves/PA Media Assignments

Spectacular demonstrations

On Saturday afternoon, Gerhard Berger returned to the cockpit of his 1989 Ferrari 640 Formula 1 car. The Ferrari, which raced in the 1989 F1 season with drivers Berger and Nigel Mansell, was the first to ever use a sequential paddle-shift transmission.

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By: Rex McAfee
Title: 81st Goodwood Member’s Meeting
Sourced From: sportscardigest.com/81st-goodwood-members-meeting/
Published Date: Tue, 16 Apr 2024 18:36:28 +0000

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Wild Rover – 1966 Rover P6

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Photo: Pete Austin
Photo: Pete AustinMaking its debut in 1963, the Rover P6 was introduced as the new jewel in the crown of the Rover fleet. The car was voted European Car of the Year in 1964 and it revelled in the glow of Britain’s last true motor manufacturing era. By the time the P6 reached the end of its shelf life in 1977, Britain’s motor car industry was in a spiral of decline from which it would never recover.

 “a bit of an animal” around Silverstone
Author enjoyed taking the car he referred to as “a bit of an animal” around Silverstone, revelling in its responsiveness as he applied its ample power.
Photo: Pete AustinThe Rover P6 in its road-going 2-liter, 2.2-liter or mighty 3.5-liter specification was popular. Built at Solihull in the British West Midlands, the Rover was very much the executive’s car of the era. Used by company managers and by the police as a “Panda” car, the Rover was a car of style and only a Jaguar parked on your driveway allowed the man of middle England to feel he enjoyed a higher social standing.

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The post Wild Rover – 1966 Rover P6 appeared first on Sports Car Digest.

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By: SportsCarDigest
Title: Wild Rover – 1966 Rover P6
Sourced From: sportscardigest.com/wild-rover-1966-rover-p6/
Published Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2024 06:59:32 +0000

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HEMI HEAVEN: The Engine of Our Dreams

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HEMI HEAVEN: The Engine of Our Dreams
LOT #760 – 1970 PLYMOUTH HEMI ‘CUDA – NO RESERVE

The HEMI engine, known for its hemispherical shaped combustion chamber, stands as an icon in the realm of automotive engineering, renowned for its power, distinctive sound and enduring legacy. What sets the HEMI apart is its unique combustion chamber design, featuring hemispherical-shaped heads with the spark plug is placed at the top-center, which shortens the burn distance of the air/fuel mixture, allowing for optimal combustion that results in performance all car enthusiasts can appreciate.

One of the key factors contributing to the HEMI’s legendary status is its storied history. Developed by Chrysler in the early 1950s, the HEMI quickly gained a reputation for dominating the racetrack and the streets alike. Its presence in NASCAR, drag racing and other motorsports solidified its status as a symbol of speed and performance.

Beyond its racing pedigree, the HEMI engine has left an indelible mark on popular culture. From muscle cars like the Dodge Charger and Challenger to iconic vehicles like the Plymouth ’Cuda and the Chrysler 300, the HEMI has powered some of the most beloved and memorable collector vehicles in history.

The HEMI’s enduring popularity can be attributed to its ongoing evolution and innovation. While the basic design principles remain consistent, modern iterations of the HEMI engine feature advanced technologies that include variable valve timing, cylinder deactivation and direct fuel injection, enhancing both performance and efficiency.

The HEMI engine’s combination of history, performance and cultural significance has cemented its status as one of the most iconic and legendary powerplants in automotive history. With its distinctive design, unmistakable sound and unrivaled performance, the HEMI engine remains a symbol of power, speed and American automotive ingenuity. Check out these HEMI-powered vehicles selling with No Reserve at the April 18-20 Palm Beach Auction.

LOT #760 – 1970 PLYMOUTH HEMI ‘CUDA – NO RESERVE

Pictured above, this 1970 HEMI ‘Cuda is powered by a correct 426ci HEMI V8 engine with a 727 TorqueFlite automatic transmission. In Tor-Red with black graphics, Shaker hood, Rallye wheels, black vinyl upholstery, Rallye gauges, wood-rimmed steering wheel. Well documented; Wise Report included.

Powered by a 1,000hp-capable supercharged HEMI 6.2-liter V8 engine paired with an 8-speed automatic transmission. Includes black leather, Brembo brakes, Demon badges and trim, yellow engine block and forged aluminum wheels. 11 actual miles.

LOT #694 – MR. NORM’S 1964 DODGE POLARA 330 HEMI FACTORY LIGHTWEIGHT DRAG CAR – NO RESERVE

Powered by a 426ci HEMI 8-cylinder engine fitted with Holley 4160 4-barrel carburetors, paired with a Chrysler 727 TorqueFlite 3-speed automatic transmission. Glove compartment door signed by “Mr. Norm” Kraus. From The Washer Collection.

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By: Barrett-Jackson
Title: HEMI HEAVEN: The Engine of Our Dreams
Sourced From: www.barrett-jackson.com/Media/Home/Reader/hemi-heaven-the-engine-of-our-dreams/
Published Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2024 16:36:23 +0000

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