Connect with us

Thinning the herd: My Kawasaki H1 awaits its new owner and home.
Thinning the herd: My Kawasaki H1 awaits its new owner and home. (Anders T. Carlson/)

Chances are you’ve spent time on Bring a Trailer. For most of us, it’s not about actually buying or selling a used motorcycle or car. It’s about watching other people go through said process with noteworthy vehicles. Then commenting on it.

Born as a blog in 2007, BaT exists because fellow car/motorcycle nerds like you exist. BaT’s vetting and curation process is key. It ensures a steady stream of surprising, engaging rarities for sale, even when the hoi polloi doesn’t approve. Jalopnik regularly features a “Biggest Sucker on Bring a Trailer” column, which is recommended reading. Bring a Trailer has been owned by Hearst Auto Group since 2020 and benefits from Hearst assets, notably Car and Driver and Road & Track magazine, which no doubt amplify their audience. It’s part of a “synergistic” strategy of connected interests scratching each other’s backs while growing and supporting a community.

The BaT folks have made compelling spectator sport for those in capitalism’s lower (and higher up) rungs. Do you attend Mecum auctions? Probably not. But BaT connects the haves and the have-nots of the automotive and motorcycling world in one long scroll. They ensure an unbiased, uniform experience for buyer and seller that results in fair outcomes and great reading.

I’m selling a 1975 Kawasaki H1F I bought nine years ago. I didn’t restore it, but I got it running, raced it once, and generally enjoyed owning it. But it’s time for it to go. The bike nearly killed its previous owner, so I replaced the frame and swingarm, plus the speedo/tach housing. In mid-2014, I found exactly one compatible H1 frame for sale, a 1973 (H1D) example. With the ‘73 frame, it’s a Vermont-registered (not titled) Kawasaki H1D in the legal sense. It’s a complete ‘75 H1F, as far as engine, colors, and bodywork are concerned. If the right buyer’s cool with this, they’ll have a fun summer terrorizing the EPA and common sense. Prices on H1s are high, with pristine later examples fetching $10K or more. My H1 isn’t anywhere close to that. But what is it worth? Time to find out.

From start to finish, it takes about 45 days to go from acceptance letter to finished auction. Just getting accepted felt like a feat. Not just any vehicle goes up on the BaT auction block. My bike was accepted on June 1; by July 8 it was live. As per the BaT process, the listing is written entirely by an auction consultant, a nice guy named Chris. I was unsuccessful in reaching Chris for comment about being a BaT consultant, but he seemed genuine about wanting me to have a good BaT experience.

I included pics of an article I wrote about my half-assed efforts to get it running and race it, figuring it might give the bike “provenance.” Bad idea. Instead of just listing its faults, I’d literally written a whole story about them. As is his job, Chris grilled me on various anomalies from my description and the pictures, like the bent subframe and crash damage. Motojournalism isn’t the unfair advantage many assume it must be, and doesn’t necessarily add value to a vehicle.

Chris wove my story into a legally unassailable tale of shortcomings, disclosures, and brutal honesty that would hold up in any court of law. By the third sentence, the crash history and 31 years of storage were disclosed. The lack of title arrived in the second paragraph, along with more descriptions of damage. But it was all correct, true, and accurate, as affirmed by the idiot owner of this “widowmaker.”

Once BaT had earned its $99 auction fee, it was time to be judged.

Day 1

Bring a Trailer doesn’t like auctions to go live if the seller isn’t close at hand to what they’re selling. But now I’m back, it’s up, and I’m damn excited. Thousands of fellow losers can see what I spent the last few months finalizing. Immediately, comments trickle in. Rather than reading the listing, folks ask redundant questions and offer expert opinions. Bring a Trailer fans note that the comments are a sort of “policing” of the community and auction integrity. I can see that. Looks like they’re handing out deputy badges at the Anybody Corral. You can flag comments as “not constructive,” but I decide to see how the conversation plays out, good or bad.

A $555 bid starts the day off. Heyyy, big spender.

Day 2

If there was a “Nuke the Commentator” button, I’d bloody my fingers pressing it. Evidently, my H1 is a disappointment to motorcycling. There’s the bike people want to see; then there’s the bike actually being sold. Comments roll in bemoaning how the latter is not the former.

Read More

—————-

By: Anders T. Carlson
Title: What’s Selling a Motorcycle on Bring a Trailer Like?
Sourced From: www.motorcyclistonline.com/story/news/how-to-sell-a-motorcycle-on-bring-a-trailer/
Published Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2022 10:00:08 +0000

Did you miss our previous article…
https://www.mansbrand.com/barrett-jacksons-2022-las-vegas-auction-to-feature-more-than-20-american-built-collector-cars-from-the-high-octane-collection/

Motor

WHICH WAY TO THE BEACH? Classic Collectibles Perfect for Coastal Cruising

277841 Front 3 4 200x133 1 jpg

>

WHICH WAY TO THE BEACH? Classic Collectibles Perfect for Coastal Cruising
LOT #698 – 2023 DODGE DEMON 170 CUSTOM CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE

Let’s face it: We gearheads spend entirely too much time talking about horsepower, performance, going fast and turning corners. Maybe it’s time to just slow down and enjoy the ride.

Back in the ’50s and ’60s, cruising was all the rage (think “American Graffiti”). It was a simple love of rolling through town on a Saturday night in your pride and joy, hanging out with your friends and just having fun.

When it comes to driving in Florida, however, cruising in your favorite collector car – in this case, preferably a convertible – inevitably means heading to the beach. Put on your shades, drop that top and feel those ocean breezes as you head down the Sunshine State’s scenic highway, the A1A.

We can’t imagine anything better than cruising the Florida coast in a classic Cadillac or Lincoln. Land yachts, anyone? Perhaps a beautiful Bel Air or Buick. Does that top on your Resto-Modded Bronco or Blazer come off? Go for it. Heck – even if your ride isn’t a convertible, just roll all those windows down, crank up the tunes and take delight in the drive.

Enjoy this sample of potentially great beach cruisers – each selling with No Reserve at the 2024 Palm Beach Auction, April 18-20 at the South Florida Fairgrounds. As Ferris Bueller once said, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” Don’t miss the chance to put yourself behind the wheel of one of these beauties and head for the coast.

LOT #698 – 2023 DODGE DEMON 170 CUSTOM CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE
Pictured above, this Demon convertible is powered by a 6.2-liter 8-cylinder engine paired with an 8-speed automatic transmission. Authorized and warrantied convertible conversion performed by Jeff Moran of Droptop Customs.

LOT #657 – 1987 FERRARI 328 GTS TARGA – NO RESERVE

Finished in a Rosso Corsa Red exterior over a Connolly tan interior. Recently serviced, including timing belt and all fluids. Serviced and overhauled all suspension and brake systems. 19,503 miles (title reads exempt).

LOT #680 – 1962 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 327/340 CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE

Powered by a 327/340hp V8 engine with 4-speed manual transmission. Recipient of an older frame-off restoration in Tuxedo Black with black interior and black convertible top. Bloomington Gold and Top Flight award-winner. Includes owner’s manual and awards.

LOT #765 – 1965 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL CUSTOM CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE

California car powered by an LS-powered fuel-injected V8 engine backed by an automatic transmission. Rides on Air Lift suspension. Equipped with custom leather interior and integrated entertainment pad touchscreen with Bluetooth.

LOT #697 – 1967 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CUSTOM CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE

Powered by a 6.2-liter LS V8 engine and 5-speed manual transmission. In Gunmetal Gray with a custom red leather interior and red canvas convertible top. Includes an Art Morrison chassis, Vintage Air, power steering, Wilwood disc brakes and power windows.

Powered by a 390ci V8 engine paired with an automatic transmission. Frame-on restoration to original condition. New brakes, master cylinder and mufflers. Purchased from dealer showroom floor in 1959.

LOT #668 – 1968 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CUSTOM CONVERTIBLE – NO RESERVE

Powered by a fuel-injected 383ci stroker BluePrint engine using a Holley Sniper unit, providing 491hp and 455 ft/lbs of torque based on the dyno sheet. Backed by a 5-speed TREMEC manual transmission.

Powered by its original 272ci engine and automatic transmission. Completely restored to its factory condition, with the “Bumble Bee” color scheme and power convertible top.

Read More

—————-

By: Barrett-Jackson
Title: WHICH WAY TO THE BEACH? Classic Collectibles Perfect for Coastal Cruising
Sourced From: www.barrett-jackson.com/Media/Home/Reader/which-way-to-the-beach-classic-collectibles-perfect-for-coastal-cruising/
Published Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2024 15:36:07 +0000

Did you miss our previous article…
https://mansbrand.com/adventure-awaits-4x4s-will-take-you-wherever-you-want-to-go/

Continue Reading

Motor

ADVENTURE AWAITS: 4x4s Will Take You Wherever You Want To Go

276606 Front 3 4 200x132 1 jpg

>

ADVENTURE AWAITS: 4x4s Will Take You Wherever You Want To Go
LOT #700 – 1971 FORD BRONCO CUSTOM SUV – NO RESERVE

When you think about it, it’s not surprising that four-wheel drive has been around for more than two centuries. After all, the roads back in the late 1800s were certainly in less-than-ideal condition, so drivers naturally welcomed the ability to travel on challenging road surfaces without worry.

The world’s first four-wheel-drive car directly powered by an internal-combustion engine was the Dutch Spyker 60 HP, commissioned for the Paris to Madrid race of 1903. But it was the advent of war that brought four-wheel-drive vehicles into mass production. The 3-ton FWD Model B Nash Quad became a standard military four-wheel-drive truck for the U.S. Army in World War I. The Quad not only came with four-wheel-drive and four-wheel brakes, but also featured four-wheel steering. It was one of the first successful four-wheel-drive vehicles ever to be made.

The World War II Jeep, originally developed by American Bantam but mass-produced by Willys and Ford, became the best-known four-wheel-drive vehicle in the world during World War II. As soon as the war was nearly over, Willys developed the CJ2, which gave rise to the CJ2A in 1945. Hot on its heels, Dodge also started production of the civilian 4WD Power Wagon trucks for the 1946 model year. Both the Willys and the Dodge were developed directly from their WWII predecessors.

Today’s rugged four-wheel-drive vehicles often showcase an incredible blend of both utility and comfort. The fantastic 4x4s headed to the 2024 Palm Beach Auction with No Reserve are perfect examples of vehicles that don’t stop performing when the pavement ends.

LOT #700 – 1971 FORD BRONCO CUSTOM SUV – NO RESERVE

Pictured above is a 1971 Ford Bronco custom SUV powered by Gen 3 Coyote 5.0-Liter V8 engine mated to a 10-speed automatic transmission, with 4-wheel drive. Has dual exhaust, headers, cold-air intake, 2.5-inch suspension lift and a 3-inch body lift. Rides on 20-inch KMC wheels wrapped in 35-inch tires.

LOT #691 – 1971 FORD BRONCO CUSTOM SUV – NO RESERVE

Nicknamed “Black Betty;” rotisserie-restored and custom-built by JFB Off Road. Powered by a BluePrint Engines 306/370hp crate engine and a 4-speed auto transmission. Finished in Tuxedo Black with a Wimbledon White hardtop over a custom leather interior.

LOT #752 – 1972 GMC JIMMY CUSTOM SUV – NO RESERVE

Powered by an LS3 430hp V8 engine and automatic transmission. Fully restored and customized with Chevrolet grille, tailgate and badges, Ringbrothers door handles, custom wood floor, Vintage Air system, Dakota Digital gauges and 17-inch U.S. Mags wheels.

Powered by a built fuel-injected 347ci stroker V8 engine mated to an AX15 5-speed manual transmission, with 4×4. Has 2.5-inch suspension lift, Bilstein shocks, Vintage Air, Flowmaster exhaust, hydro-boost 4-wheel disc brakes and 18-inch Moto Metal wheels.

Built by Time Warp Customs and displayed at the Rubicon Express booth at SEMA 2017. Powered by a 6.4-liter 392ci V8 engine rated at 485hp and 475 ft/lbs of torque. 3,837 actual miles on the truck and build. May not be emissions compliant in all 50 states.

Powered by a 6.4-liter inline-6 Cummins diesel engine and an automatic transmission. Highly modified build that includes a functional 2016 Ram Mega Cab interior with air conditioning, custom bed, Kelderman air suspension and American Force wheels.

LOT #751 – 1991 LAND ROVER DEFENDER 130 CUSTOM SUV – NO RESERVE

Powered by a new LS3 6.2-liter 425hp V8 engine paired with a 6-speed GM 6L80E automatic transmission. Has new chassis, suspension, steering, driveline and interior. Equipped with AP 4-wheel disc brakes. May not be emissions compliant in all 50 states.

Read More

—————-

By: Barrett-Jackson
Title: ADVENTURE AWAITS: 4x4s Will Take You Wherever You Want To Go
Sourced From: www.barrett-jackson.com/Media/Home/Reader/adventure-awaits-4x4s-will-take-you-wherever-you-want-to-go/
Published Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2024 16:00:23 +0000

Continue Reading

Motor

Who Are These Mystery Motorcycle Racers From the 1970s?

FJDMZK7RGZFKBAIKY5P5ARTWTM jpg

Flat-track racers a split second after the flag drops. Know where and when was this photo taken? Let us know in the comments.
Flat-track racers a split second after the flag drops. Know where and when was this photo taken? Let us know in the comments. (Anonymous/Unknown/)

Any idea who this vintage racer named Mike is? Or where he’s having all this fun? If so, let us know.

A recent purchase of an abandoned Chicagoland storage locker turned up a trove of racing photographs from the 1970s and ‘80s. Early this year, a buyer who wishes to remain anonymous found 53 large- and small-format photographs of a racer named Mike who enjoyed flat-track racing, owned a red van, and liked roadracing as well. And he took a trip to Daytona at some point. Perhaps he owned or worked at a radio/electronics shop called “Radiotronics”?

Mike looked like a fun guy. He had cool racing duds from Lancer Leathers, liked doing wheelies on pitbikes, and looked good on his Yamaha two-stroke tracker and roadrace bike. Judging by the number of van pictures, he also loved van life. And he knew who famous racer Don Vesco was, since he snapped a pic of his van.

The buyer notes that items found in the storage unit indicate Mike having lived in Alabama, with family or friends possibly located in Chicago’s north suburbs. His race number was 117 and 217. Could it be AMA-sanctioned racing? The roadracing photos could be from the pits in Daytona, though it’s unclear. It seems he also rode a red Yamaha TD2 or TR2 with No. 373. It was a popular race setup in the ‘70s, with a trick swingarm and non-stock frame. You could buy a racing-prepped bike straight from the dealer.

They’re a wonderful glimpse into someone’s past life. Before smartphones and ubiquitous cameras, photography took time, commitment, and care. Time has given the pictures a tint and hue that Instagram filters can’t replicate. Maybe one of our loyal Motorcyclist readers could shed some light on this minor mystery? Any info or helpful clues can be posted in the comments section.

A man identified as Mike, sponsored by Competition Cycles, puts down power and a steel shoe around an unidentified dirt track, sometime in the 1970s or ’80s.
A man identified as Mike, sponsored by Competition Cycles, puts down power and a steel shoe around an unidentified dirt track, sometime in the 1970s or ’80s. (Anonymous/Unknown/)
A proud portrait of Mike the mystery racer with leathers made by a company called Lancer Leathers, sometime in the 1970s or ’80s.
A proud portrait of Mike the mystery racer with leathers made by a company called Lancer Leathers, sometime in the 1970s or ’80s. (Anonymous/Unknown/)
Mike the mystery racer (117) in the middle of a pack, track and date unknown.
Mike the mystery racer (117) in the middle of a pack, track and date unknown. (Anonymous/Unknown/)
Either they’re working on their race face, or a track official is yelling at them. A riders’ meeting, track and date unknown.
Either they’re working on their race face, or a track official is yelling at them. A riders’ meeting, track and date unknown. (Anonymous/Unknown/)
An unidentified Yamaha racer holding court. An unidentified Yamaha dirt track bike and roadracer (possibly a TD2 or TR2?) awaiting a new rear tire, date and track unknown.
An unidentified Yamaha racer holding court. An unidentified Yamaha dirt track bike and roadracer (possibly a TD2 or TR2?) awaiting a new rear tire, date and track unknown. (Anonymous/Unknown/)
An unidentified track official at

<p><a href=Read More

—————-

By: Anders T. Carlson
Title: Who Are These Mystery Motorcycle Racers From the 1970s?
Sourced From: www.motorcyclistonline.com/photo-galleries/who-are-these-mystery-motorcycle-racers-from-1970s/
Published Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2024 16:53:28 +0000

Did you miss our previous article…
https://mansbrand.com/best-fuel-efficient-motorcycles-2024/

Continue Reading

Trending